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Me Before You by Jojo Moyes

Louisa Clark is an ordinary girl living an exceedingly ordinary life—steady boyfriend, close family—who has never been farther afield than their tiny village. She takes a badly needed job working for ex-Master of the Universe Will Traynor, who is wheelchair-bound after an accident. Will has always lived a huge life—big deals, extreme sports, worldwide travel—and now he’s pretty sure he cannot live the way he is.

Will is acerbic, moody, bossy—but Lou refuses to treat him with kid gloves, and soon his happiness means more to her than she expected. When she learns that Will has shocking plans of his own, she sets out to show him that life is still worth living.

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You know how sometimes you read those books, and you feel like your life will never be the same again? Yeah. That.

To be honest, I thought I knew exactly what was coming when I picked up this book. Woman in bad relationship, man feeling suicidal, woman trying to change his mind. Pretty predictable, right? Boy was I wrong, about everything there was to be wrong about.
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Sculpting David; a book review

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I saw this book being advertised on twitter, and so was given this book for free for review. This has not affected my review in any way

Add it on Goodreads here

The first part of this book was written from David’s point of view, and it was by far the part I liked the least. His thoughts were incredibly disjointed, and it made it difficult to read. There were little ** every paragraph, and to me those mean a bigger jump in time than just a shift in conversation. He also made the worst mistake of telling us everything, and Loki FacepalmCapitalising words like “in the Love” which really didn’t need a capital. Sometimes, sure, but there’s a point and it was definitely passed. What made me even more mad is that I know the author is better than that; they proved it in the next two parts! This part centred entirely on David, and I know that was the point of the book. But his “blue eyed boy” and Helen and his family had brief mentions, where he talked about the impact they had on his life. They had no personality, though, and that bothered me. I wanted to fall in love with them just as much as he had! And, oh, we’ll get to the sexuality thing. It deserves it’s own paragraph, that mess.  Continue reading “Sculpting David; a book review”

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Timekeeper; My True Loves (and giveaway!)

Two o’clock was missing.

In an alternate Victorian world controlled by clock towers, a damaged clock can fracture time—and a destroyed one can stop it completely.

It’s a truth that seventeen-year-old clock mechanic Danny Hart knows all too well; his father has been trapped in a Stopped town east of London for three years. Though Danny is a prodigy who can repair not only clockwork, but the very fabric of time, his fixation with staging a rescue is quickly becoming a concern to his superiors.

And so they assign him to Enfield, a town where the tower seems to be forever plagued with problems. Danny’s new apprentice both annoys and intrigues him, and though the boy is eager to work, he maintains a secretive distance. Danny soon discovers why: he is the tower’s clock spirit, a mythical being that oversees Enfield’s time. Though the boys are drawn together by their loneliness, Danny knows falling in love with a clock spirit is forbidden, and means risking everything he’s fought to achieve.

But when a series of bombings at nearby towers threaten to Stop more cities, Danny must race to prevent Enfield from becoming the next target or he’ll not only lose his father, but the boy he loves, forever.

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Cursed Child; A Spoiler-Free Review From A Disappointed Hardcore Fan

Based on an original new story by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany, a new play by Jack Thorne, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is the eighth story in the Harry Potter series and the first official Harry Potter story to be presented on stage. The play will receive its world premiere in London’s West End on July 30, 2016.

It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband and father of three school-age children.

While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places.

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Here’s the thing about Cursed Child. I’m a huge Harry Potter nerd, so I was squealing and jumping up and down when I heard there was going to be a new book in the universe. My favourites were COMING BACK. Who wouldn’t be excited by that?? What I didn’t realise, though, was that there wasn’t going to be a new book. There was going to be a new stage show, that they were giving us the script for because they felt sorry for us non-England folk. This is a very different situation.
Continue reading “Cursed Child; A Spoiler-Free Review From A Disappointed Hardcore Fan”

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Saint Anything by Sarah Dessen

Peyton, Sydney’s charismatic older brother, has always been the star of the family, receiving the lion’s share of their parents’ attention and—lately—concern. When Peyton’s increasingly reckless behavior culminates in an accident, a drunk driving conviction, and a jail sentence, Sydney is cast adrift, searching for her place in the family and the world. When everyone else is so worried about Peyton, is she the only one concerned about the victim of the accident?

Enter the Chathams, a warm, chaotic family who run a pizza parlor, play bluegrass on weekends, and pitch in to care for their mother, who has multiple sclerosis. Here Sydney experiences unquestioning acceptance. And here she meets Mac, gentle, watchful, and protective, who makes Sydney feel seen, really seen, for the first time.

The uber-popular Sarah Dessen explores her signature themes of family, self-discovery, and change in her twelfth novel, sure to delight her legions of fans.

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Saint Anything

Sarah Dessen is the kind of author you either love or you hate. Even though the books are completely different, the feel of them is somehow the same. So, if you’ve already tried one of her books and didn’t enjoy it, click of this right now. Otherwise, let me convince you to pick up this book ASAP. Continue reading “Saint Anything by Sarah Dessen”
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Atonement; This Changed EVERYTHING

Ian McEwan’s symphonic novel of love and war, childhood and class, guilt and forgiveness provides all the satisfaction of a brilliant narrative and the provocation we have come to expect from this master of English prose.

On a hot summer day in 1934, thirteen-year-old Briony Tallis witnesses a moment’s flirtation between her older sister, Cecilia, and Robbie Turner, the son of a servant and Cecilia’s childhood friend. But Briony’s incomplete grasp of adult motives—together with her precocious literary gifts—brings about a crime that will change all their lives. As it follows that crime’s repercussions through the chaos and carnage of World War II and into the close of the twentieth century, Atonement engages the reader on every conceivable level, with an ease and authority that mark it as a genuine masterpiece.

Atonement

Ahh, Atonement. One of those books that I think I’m going to give a certain rating, then have to drastically change everything I ever thought I knew by the time I get to the end. Don’t you just love those sorts of books? Continue reading “Atonement; This Changed EVERYTHING”