Posted in Book Reviews, Posts

All the Bright Places

Theodore Finch is fascinated by death, and he constantly thinks of ways he might kill himself. But each time, something good, no matter how small, stops him.
Violet Markey lives for the future, counting the days until graduation, when she can escape her Indiana town and her aching grief in the wake of her sister’s recent death.
When Finch and Violet meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school, it’s unclear who saves whom. And when they pair up on a project to discover the “natural wonders” of their state, both Finch and Violet make more important discoveries: It’s only with Violet that Finch can be himself—a weird, funny, live-out-loud guy who’s not such a freak after all. And it’s only with Finch that Violet can forget to count away the days and start living them. But as Violet’s world grows, Finch’s begins to shrink.
This is an intense, gripping novel perfect for fans of Jay Asher, Rainbow Rowell, John Green, Gayle Forman, and Jenny Downham from a talented new voice in YA, Jennifer Niven.

All the Bright Places Book Cover

I’m usually a really tough book reviewer. There’s always something that I’d like to fix, or a certain part where I got a little bit bored. So for this book to get 5 stars from me.. Well, that in itself tells you how amazing it was. Oh, and just be warned; this review is a lot more serious than my other ones. I let my anger and my sadness take over me in the last bit… But we’ll start with the positive stuff!
From the first page, I fell in love with Finch. How could I not? He’s absolutely amazing. Okay, yeah, he’s a little crazy. Well, a LOT crazy. But I love him. He liked to dream up crazy things, and go for runs at night, and make the solar system in his wardrobe. He was bullied, and all he needed was a friend. I loved finding out more about what made him tick. It’s weird, but I find depressed people so interesting to read about. And he was suicidal, and wouldn’t admit it to himself. That’s the most interesting kind. I also loved how sure of himself he was. When he wanted something, he went out and got it. Nothing could stand in his way. His ending was a little predictable though. Even you, person who hasn’t read this book, could probably guess what happens to him just from the blurb. But that didn’t make me love him less.
Violet wasn’t nearly as cool, but I still liked her. In fact, it was Violet’s story that made me cry. She accidentally killed her sister, driving the car that she crashed in and died. She blamed herself for that (which was where her suicidal thoughts came from). So yeah, that’s what made me cry. Her character development was the best though. At the start, she was miserable, and used Eleanor as an excuse to get out of everything. But by the end, she… Of course she wasn’t over Eleanor. But Finch made her a better person. A happier person. They improved each other, and that’s exactly what love is meant to be like. Like Finch said, “You make me lovely, and it’s so lovely to be lovely to the one I love.”All the Bright Places
This story was so powerful. We got to go inside the heads of two suicidal teenagers. These two felt like their lives were falling apart, and they were so young. Way too young to be thinking things like that. This book made me feel so ANGRY. How are we letting people feel like that? How can you think it’s okay to call someone “Theodore Freak” over and over and over? I hope that if I saw someone standing on a ledge and looking they were about to jump, I wouldn’t write a newspaper article about it. I’d get off my butt and do something about it. But no one in this book knew what to do. So all of them – their friends, their family – looked away. They thought that if they pretended nothing was happening, they’d get better. The author posted some helpful websites in her author’s note about where you can go if you’re having thoughts like that. And I just want to reinforce what she said – GET HELP. There are people out there who can help you. You are not alone. If you’re too scared to talk to someone you know (which I understand), go online. Talk to anonymous people. Talk to me, or other people online. YOU ARE NOT ALONE. No matter what you think, there is always someone who cares about you. I don’t know you, but I would miss you if you were gone. You are precious, and you can’t ever forget that. Finch and Violet didn’t realise that, and they let it eat them up inside. Even if you hated this book, remember that no one deserves to feel like that. No one.

Advertisements

Author:

I was a book blogger for a while, and I now blog about every little thing in life I can think of. Bear with me while I try all these new posts out... I'm a New Zealand teen who gets angry about the world (but not angry enough for tumblr). I like to capture the world through photos and words, and read in all the moments in nz-squadbetween. I have an overwhelming desire to see every corner of the world I possibly can, and hug the people I love in all those corners. I can't do make up to save myself, and you're more likely to find me buying matching stationary than matching clothes. My nerd hobbies include a new found love of the Avengers, reading YA, watching Game of Thrones, How I Met Your Mother, and every vlogger I can find, and being the last person on the music bandwagons. I have big plans for the rest of my life, including university, teaching, travelling, and having an army of puppies. I plan to blog every second of it!

10 thoughts on “All the Bright Places

  1. I can understand how this book made you feel so many things. I really did feel for Violet who believed she killed her sister. That is a lot of weight to be carrying on your shoulders and she chose to bear it from her guilt. But in this book that is so beautifully written Niven carefully shows us what hurts, how it hurts, and how even with the good happening around there is still some hurt there too. The good being their relationship. I loved this one and well, it was definitely memorable.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s